• Care for children - Compassion for self

    Changing the narratives, the beliefs about identity and relationships that traumatised children have learnt is hard work.  It takes time and repetition (just as forming the problematic narratives and beliefs did) and the opportunity to do so in healthy, attuned relationships.

  • Schools as Service Providers

    Guest blogger, registered psychologist and school counsellor Deborah Costa shares her model around Trauma Informed systems and services for school as service providers.
  • Running Away... to School.

    How do we help our students feel safe? The start of the new school year is upon us, and Alexa Duke explores the implications of current research on bringing about a sense of safety and calm in our classrooms. 

  • School Bullying Trauma - An Overview

    Although most schools try to reduce bullying, one in five children still experience bullying. Omitted from the DSM V, school bullying can cause biopsychosocial injuries, loss of identity and social connections together with a potential for suicidal behaviours, and is a major childhood challenge writes guest blogger, Evelyn Fields OAM.

  • Engaging Traumatised Parents in the School Environment

    For many of us, school holds fond memories but for others, school holds many triggers for trauma – the oval where they were bullied, the corridor where they were physically assaulted, the classroom where they were often publicly humiliated, the sting and the shame of corporal punishment, the principal’s office where they were frequently suspended. And I wonder if we, as educators, have ever stopped to walk through the school gates in the shoes of our most vulnerable parents?
  • Mental Health, Young People and Trauma

    Increased diagnosis in mental health may be masking our understanding of, and response to, behaviours that are really manifestations of trauma writes Alexa Duke.

  • Transforming Trauma in Schools

    Children and young people around Australia are struggling to participate in school life because their brains are shutting down due to toxic stress. When exposed to levels of high stress like trauma and abuse, children and young people can struggle to follow simple instructions even - resulting in them often being perceived as naughty kids.